News Archive

These researchers say they hope their refined method for testing for the barber pole worm in animals can help farmers. They expect the new method of testing to save the sheep and wool industry a significant amount of money

Read Full Story

The Oregon Coast Aquarium’s effort to rehabilitate two stranded sea turtles continues, with improvement in both turtles, found on different beaches last November. An Olive Ridley sea turtle was found stranded on Agate Beach in Newport and a Green sea turtle was discovered on the southern Washington coast.

Read Full Story

For the third year in a row, a group of OSU VetMed students, led by four veterinarians and one technician, went to the Nicaraguan island of Ometepe.

Read Full Story
12/29/2009
Researchers use novel approach to show chlorophyll's effect (OSU News & Research Communication)

A new study has found that chlorophyll and its derivative chlorophyllin are effective in limiting the absorption of aflatoxin in humans. Aflatoxin is produced by a fungus that is a contaminant of grains including corn, peanuts and soybeans; it is known to cause liver cancer – and can work in concert with other health concerns, such as hepatitis.

Read Full Story
11/23/2009
Can my pet get the swine flu? (The Bend Bulletin)

DeBess said a sample of the ferret’s nasal secretions was sent to the Oregon State University’s Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, which confirmed a diagnosis of H1N1.

Read Full Story

A Lebanon cat has died in what is believed to be the first confirmed H1N1 feline fatality in the U.S., according to the Oregon Veterinary Medical Association.

Read Full Story

"Dog Daze and Cat Naps," published last month by Borgo Press, is a fictional account of a young man undergoing four years of study, dealing with the serious and mundane aspects of that journey as well as the mishaps, and finding the humorous side.

Read Full Story

Veterinarians are vital to the livestock industry. They’re the clinicians who pull problem calves, the researchers working on new vaccines, the epidemiologists studying health issues that affect livestock, the teachers of tomorrow’s veterinarians—and the people most likely to diagnose a foreign animal disease in the field and start containing it.

Read Full Story