Effects of long-term treatment of mice with anti-I-J monoclonal antibody and dialyzable leukocyte extract on immune function and lifespan.

TitleEffects of long-term treatment of mice with anti-I-J monoclonal antibody and dialyzable leukocyte extract on immune function and lifespan.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1984
AuthorsLiu JJ, Segre D, Gelberg HB, Fudenberg HH, Tsang KY, Khansari N, Waltenbaugh CR, Segre M
JournalMechanisms of ageing and development
Volume27
Issue3
Pagination359-72
Date Published1984 Oct 31
ISSN0047-6374
KeywordsAging, Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Female, gamma-Globulins, H-2 Antigens, Immunity, Immunization, Leukocytes, Longevity, Mice, Mice, Inbred Strains, T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory
Abstract

In 1969 Walford hypothesized that age-related dysfunctions of the immune system may be involved in the pathogenesis of the lesions and disease of aging. Studies were initiated to test whether immunologic interventions intended to maintain the integrity of the immune system would delay the onset of diseases of aging and prolong lifespan. Adult BC3F1 mice were treated with anti-I-J monoclonal antibody, with human dialyzable leukocyte extract, or with saline once a week for one year. Spleen cells from the mice were then assayed for suppressor, T-helper and B-cell activity. Treatment with dialyzable leukocyte extract decreased the elevated nonspecific suppressor activity. Mice treated with anti-I-J antibody had elevated T-helper cell activity. In another experiment, mice were treated weekly with anti-I-J antibody, dialyzable leukocyte extract, or saline from 18 months of age until natural death. The mice were immunized with avian gammaglobulin at 27 and again at 29 months of age. Both types of immunologic intervention resulted in a greater secondary antibody response than that of the saline-treated control mice. Mice treated with anti-I-J antibody survived longer than did mice of the other two groups. There was a correlation between the magnitude of the secondary response of individual mice and their lifespan. The results provide support for the immunologic theory of aging.

Alternate JournalMech. Ageing Dev.