Incorporating an audience response system into veterinary dermatology lectures: effect on student knowledge retention and satisfaction.

TitleIncorporating an audience response system into veterinary dermatology lectures: effect on student knowledge retention and satisfaction.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsPlant JD
JournalJournal of veterinary medical education
Volume34
Issue5
Pagination674-7
Date Published2007 Winter
ISSN0748-321X
KeywordsAnimals, Dermatology, Education, Veterinary, Educational Measurement, Humans, Knowledge of Results (Psychology), Students, Teaching
Abstract

Veterinary educators are charged with delivering large amounts of information to adult students, who benefit from a more interactive learning environment than is often achieved through didactic lectures. Audience response systems (ARS) with wireless keypad technology facilitate interactive learning and have been used successfully in the education of health professionals. The objectives of this pilot study were to determine the effect of an ARS on the knowledge retention of veterinary dermatology students and to survey student attitudes concerning its use. A cohort-controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the potential benefits of ARS for short-term and long-term knowledge retention. Students also participated in four hours of student-directed case simulations using ARS technology. Students were surveyed regarding opinions on the use of the ARS. The mean short-term knowledge-retention test scores of groups A (ARS+) and B (ARS-) were 81% and 78%, respectively. The mean long-term knowledge-retention test scores of groups A and B were 54% and 55%, respectively. The differences between groups were not significant for either time period (p = 0.32, p = 0.77). Although benefits to short-term and long-term knowledge retention were not detected in this pilot study, all students responding to the survey perceived a benefit and supported the use of ARS in the clinical veterinary curriculum. ARS technology provides a tool for lecturers to create an interactive learning environment well suited for teaching veterinary dermatology.

DOI10.1111/j.1365-3164.2011.00980.x
Alternate JournalJ Vet Med Educ