Lipid composition of hepatic and adipose tissues from normal cats and from cats with idiopathic hepatic lipidosis.

TitleLipid composition of hepatic and adipose tissues from normal cats and from cats with idiopathic hepatic lipidosis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1997
AuthorsHall JA, Barstad LA, Connor WE
JournalJournal of veterinary internal medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume11
Issue4
Pagination238-42
Date Published1997 Jul-Aug
ISSN0891-6640
KeywordsAdipose Tissue, alpha-Linolenic Acid, Animals, Arachidonic Acid, Cat Diseases, Cats, Cholesterol Esters, Fatty Acids, Female, Linoleic Acid, Lipid Metabolism, Lipidoses, Lipids, Liver, Liver Diseases, Male, Oleic Acid, Palmitates, Phospholipids, Stearates, Triglycerides
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to characterize the lipid classes in hepatic and adipose tissues from cats with idiopathic hepatic lipidosis (IHL). Concentrations of triglyceride, phospholipid phosphorus, and free and total cholesterol were determined in lipid extracts of liver homogenates from 5 cats with IHL and 5 healthy control cats. Total fatty acid composition of liver and adipose tissue was also compared. Triglyceride accounted for 34% of liver by weight in cats with IHL (338 +/- 38 mg/g wet liver) versus 1% in control cats (9.9 +/- 1.0 mg/g wet liver, P < .001). The mass of cholesterol ester was significantly higher in triglyceride-free (TG-free) liver from cats with IHL (741 +/- 340 micrograms/g TG-free wet liver) compared to healthy cats (31 +/- 11 micrograms/g TG-free wet liver, P < .05). Total fatty acid composition of hepatic tissue in the 2 groups differed; palmitate was higher (19.5 +/- 1.1% of total fatty acids in cats with IHL versus 9.2 +/- 2.7% in controls, P < .05), stearate was lower (8.5 +/- 0.8% versus 16.8 +/- 1.1%, P < .05), oleate was higher (41.2 +/- 1.6% versus 31.1 +/- 1.8%, P < .05), and arachidonate was lower (1.2 +/- 0.2% versus 6.0 +/- 0.9%, P < .05). The total fatty acid composition of adipose tissue also differed between the 2 groups; palmitate was higher (26.2 +/- 1.2% in cats with IHL versus 21.3 +/- 0.6% in controls, P < .05), total monounsaturated fatty acids were higher (48.4 +/- 1.0% versus 45.0 +/- 0.8%, P < .05), linolenate was lower (13.3 +/- 1.6% versus 17.5 +/- 0.9%, P < .05), total (n-6) fatty acids were lower (13.8 +/- 1.38% versus 18.4 +/- 0.83%, P < .05), linolenate was lower (0.2 +/- 0.04% versus 0.7 +/- 0.06%, P < .06), and total (n-3) fatty acids were lower (0.3 +/- 0.02% versus 1.3 +/- 0.32%, P < .05). The fatty acid composition of both liver and adipose tissue was similar for stearate, oleate, linoleate, and linolenate in cats with IHL. These results support the hypothesis that the origin of hepatic triglyceride in cats with IHL is the mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue.

Alternate JournalJ. Vet. Intern. Med.