The pathogenesis of vesicular exanthema of swine virus and San Miguel sea lion virus in swine.

TitleThe pathogenesis of vesicular exanthema of swine virus and San Miguel sea lion virus in swine.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1982
AuthorsGelberg HB, Lewis RM
JournalVeterinary pathology
Volume19
Issue4
Pagination424-43
Date Published1982 Jul
ISSN0300-9858
KeywordsAnimals, Enterovirus, Enteroviruses, Porcine, Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Microscopy, Electron, Neutralization Tests, Pinnipedia, Sea Lions, Swine, Swine Diseases, Vesicular Exanthema of Swine
Abstract

Vesicular exanthema of swine virus type A48 or San Miguel sea lion virus type 2, when inoculated intradermally into swine, resulted in fluid-filled vesicles at the sites of inoculation in the snout, coronary band, and tongue. Pigs that developed vesicles also had fevers. Secondary vesicle formation varied, depending on virus serotype. Viremia was found in one pig infected with San Miguel sea lion virus five days after infection. Virus was recovered from nasal-oral passages for up to five days after infection in both groups of pigs and from the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts of pigs infected with San Miguel sea lion virus. Neutralizing antibodies began to increase three days after inoculation and reached peak titers in seven to ten days. In the absence of secondary bacterial infection, healing was well advanced by ten days after inoculation. Lesions usually were limited to nonhaired portions of the integument and tongue. Individual epithelial cells became infected when a break in the skin allowed virus access to susceptible epithelial cells from either exogenous or endogenous sources. Individual infected cells ruptured and adjacent cells were infected, resulting in the formation of multiple microvesicles. Centrifugal coalescence of microvesicles led to formation of grossly visible macrovesicles. Lesions rarely developed from viral contamination of intact hair follicles. A mild virus-induced encephalitis was seen in pigs infected with vesicular exanthema of swine virus, and virus was recovered from brain tissue of pigs infected with San Miguel sea lion virus.

Alternate JournalVet. Pathol.