Surface-exposed proteins of pathogenic mycobacteria and the role of cu-zn superoxide dismutase in macrophages and neutrophil survival.

TitleSurface-exposed proteins of pathogenic mycobacteria and the role of cu-zn superoxide dismutase in macrophages and neutrophil survival.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsMcNamara M, Tzeng S-C, Maier C, Wu M, Bermudez LE
JournalProteome science
Volume11
Issue1
Pagination45
Date Published2013
ISSN1477-5956
Abstract

Pathogenic mycobacteria are important agents causing human disease. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (M. avium) is a species of recalcitrant environmental pathogen. The bacterium forms robust biofilms that allow it to colonize and persist in austere environments, such as residential and commercial water systems. M. avium is also an opportunistic pathogen that is a significant source of mortality for immune-compromised individuals. Proteins exposed at the bacterial surface play a central role in mediating the relationship between the bacterium and its environment. The processes underlying both biofilm formation and pathogenesis are directly dependent on this essential subset of the bacterial proteome. Therefore, the characterization of the surface-exposed proteome is an important step towards an improved understanding of the mycobacterial biology and pathogenesis. Here we examined the complement of surface exposed proteins from Mycobacterium avium 104, a clinical isolate and reference strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis. To profile the surface-exposed proteins of viable M. avium 104, bacteria were covalently labeled with a membrane impermeable biotinylation reagent and labeled proteins were affinity purified via the biotin-streptavidin interaction. The results provide a helpful snapshot of the surface-exposed proteome of this frequently utilized reference strain of M. avium. A Cu-Zn SOD knockout mutant, MAV_2043, a surface identified protein, was evaluated regarding its role in the survival in both macrophages and neutrophils.

DOI10.1186/1477-5956-11-45
Alternate JournalProteome Sci