Tylosin-responsive chronic diarrhea in dogs.

TitleTylosin-responsive chronic diarrhea in dogs.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsWestermarck E, Skrzypczak T, Harmoinen J, Steiner JM, Ruaux CG, Williams DA, Eerola E, Sundb├Ąck P, Rinkinen M
JournalJournal of veterinary internal medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume19
Issue2
Pagination177-86
Date Published2005 Mar-Apr
ISSN0891-6640
KeywordsAnimals, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Chronic Disease, Diarrhea, Dog Diseases, Dogs, Female, Lactobacillus, Male, Prednisone, Probiotics, Time Factors, Tylosin
Abstract

Fourteen dogs had shown chronic or intermittent diarrhea for more than 1 year. Diarrhea had been successfully treated with tylosin for at least 6 months but recurred when treatment was withdrawn on at least 2 occasions. Tylosin-responsive diarrhea (TRD) affects typically middle-aged, large-breed dogs and clinical signs indicate that TRD affects both the small and large intestine. Treatment with tylosin eliminated diarrhea in all dogs within 3 days and in most dogs within 24 hours. Tylosin administration controlled diarrhea in all dogs, but after it was discontinued, diarrhea reappeared in 12 (85.7%) of 14 dogs within 30 days. Prednisone given for 3 days did not completely resolve diarrhea. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG did not prevent the relapse of diarrhea in any of 9 dogs so treated. The etiology of TRD, a likely form of antibiotic-responsive diarrhea (ARD) is unclear. The following reasons for chronic diarrhea were excluded or found to be unlikely: parasites, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, inflammatory bowel disease, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, enteropathogenic bacteria (Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Yersinia spp., or Lawsoni intracellularis), and Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin and Clostridium difficile A toxin. A possible etiologic factor is a specific enteropathogenic organism that is a common resident in the canine gastrointestinal tract and is sensitive to tylosin but difficult to eradicate. Additional studies are required to identify the specific cause of TRD.

Alternate JournalJ. Vet. Intern. Med.