Elective Course Descriptions

VMB 726. Pet Bird, Reptile and Pocket Pet Medicine and Surgery. 1 week, 2 credits
Course Coordinator: Dr. Sue Tornquist, course is taught by invited speakers

This course is primarily taught as lectures and case discussions given by guest speakers who are internationally-known experts. There are some hands-on handling and procedures included. The topics covered are a comprehensive review of husbandry, medicine and surgery of pet birds, reptiles and small mammals including ferrets, rabbits, rodents, and other less common critters such as hedgehogs, sugar gliders and prairie dogs.


VMB 727. Ornamental Fish. 1 week, 2 credits. Course is taught in Newport at the Hatfield Marine Science Center
Instructor: Dr. Tim Miller-Morgan

The objectives of the course are to provide advanced instruction in the common aspects of ornamental fish medicine to forth year veterinary students and background in husbandry of ornamental fish so that students will be able to discuss husbandry problems with owners of these species. In addition, practice management will be discussed as it relates to incorporating ornamental fish into a practice. Teaching methods include lectures, hands-on laboratory and a field trip.


VMB 729. Laboratory Animal/Primate Medicine and Surgery. 2 weeks, 3 credits, can be repeated for up to 8 weeks.
Instructors: Faculty at Oregon National Primate Research Center, OHSU (Dept. of Comparative Medicine), and the Portland Veterans’ Administration Hospital

The course is designed to provide a hands-on experiential introduction to the fields of laboratory animal medicine and biomedical research There are 4 different experience options available including: primate medicine, surgery, pathology and behavioral sciences  at the Oregon National Primate Research Center, laboratory animal medicine and surgery at Oregon Health and Science University, laboratory animal medicine and surgery at the Veteran Administration Medical Center, biomedical research at Oregon National Primate Research Center and Oregon Health Science University.

Teaching methods include participation in clinical rounds, lectures, case management, surgery, anesthesia, preventive medicine, pathology, research laboratory techniques.


VMB 749. Wildlife Safari.  2 weeks, 2 credits.
Instructors: Dr. Modesto McClean and Dr. Rob Bildfell (course coordinator)

This 2 week elective (to be taken in 2 consecutive weeks) is taken at Wildlife Safari (WS) in Winston, Oregon. Students will function as part of the veterinary team responsible for the health of over 500 animals (exotic and domestic) at the facility. Students will be required to work at least 40 hours per week, including one weekend of the rotation. Students should have proof of a negative TB test within the previous 6 months to be eligible for the rotation.
Students will receive instruction in topics such as management, husbandry, nutrition and behavioral enrichment of various species held at the facility. Students will be active participants in medical and surgical procedures that are performed routinely at WS. This will include daily medical rounds, anesthesia, radiology, necropsy, and other diagnostic procedures, plus the formulation and delivery of treatments and preventative medicine protocols. Depending on the workload, students may participate in surgical procedures performed at a local animal shelter as well.  

In order to maximize the experience for participants, only 2 OSU students are permitted to register during any given week of the year. WS may prohibit registration during some weeks of the year in order to accommodate the vacation and travel schedules of the staff.

Students should bring their radiation badge to WS.

Although true of many elective rotations in veterinary medicine, the”dangerous” factor is elevated in this rotation. You will be working with wild animals and dangerous drugs – exercise appropriate caution and common sense.

Lodging may be available at Wildlife Safari.
Should not be scheduled over Christmas/New Years.


VMB 768. Histopathology  1 week, 1 credit
Instructors: Drs. Christiane Löhr, Rob Bildfell, and Elena Gorman

The purpose of the course is to give the student hands-on practical experience in the setting of a Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. This experience includes: preparing tissues for processing, interpreting and taking clinical history, performing microscopic examinations of cytologic and histologic samples, recognizing patterns of lesions, formulating  morphologic diagnoses,  creating problem lists, compiling lists of differential diagnoses, interpreting laboratory reports, discussing diagnostic and treatment options, and generating written report including discussion of the case. Students will be responsible for case follow up.

The course will include daily topic and case rounds as well as participation in Diagnostic Laboratory case management.


VMB 769 Animal Genomics. 1 week, 1 credit   
Instructor: Dr. Luiz Bermudez

The study of animal genomes and the potential importance of genomics in the future of veterinary medicine will focus on the recent sequencing of the cow and the dog genomes.  The implications of knowing the genome sequence will be discussed.  The students will also be exposed to the concept of animal cloning, with special emphasis on sheep, horses, and dogs.  The course will also address the ethical aspects of cloning of animals, such as dogs and horses.
This course will teach the students the basic concept of dog and cow genomes. Discussion will be centered on gene function, the role of certain genes, cloning of animals. The main objective of the laboratory portion of the course is to provide the students hands-on experience with genomes. Students will be required to demonstrate the skills learned in the classroom and in the laboratory during written tests and oral presentations.

VMB 772  International Veterinary Medicine. 2 Credits
Instructor:  Dr. Elena Gorman

This course is an elective which enables veterinary students to work with veterinarians and domestic animals in international settings.  

VMB 786 Advanced Histopathology. 1 week, 1 credit
Instructors: Drs. Christiane Löhr, Rob Bildfell, Elena Gorman

The purpose of the course is to give the student hands-on practical experience in the setting of a Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. This experience includes: preparing tissues for processing, interpreting and taking clinical history, performing microscopic examinations, recognizing patterns of lesions, formulating  morphologic diagnoses,  creating problem lists, compiling lists of differential diagnoses, interpreting laboratory reports, discussing diagnostic and treatment options, and generating written report including discussion of the case. Students will be responsible for case follow up.
The course will include daily topic and case rounds as well as participation in Diagnostic Laboratory case management

VMC 711 Cardiology. 2 weeks. 2 credits. Note: This course may be taken for 1 week as an elective, if you’ve already taken 2 weeks of Cardiology.
Instructor: Dr. David Sisson

The objective of this course is to give the student additional hands-on practical experience in a clinical setting in taking a clinical history, performing a cardiovascular physical examinations, recording electrocardiograms, interpreting thoracic radiographs and echocardiograms, creating problem lists, compiling lists of differential diagnosis, formulating diagnostic and therapeutic plans, discussing treatment options, generating medical records, and discharging patients.  Students will be responsible for case follow up. Emphasis will be placed on patient evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of diseases of dogs, cats and horses.


VMC 712 Oncology. 2 weeks. 2 credits. Note: This course may be taken for 1 week as an elective, if you’ve already taken 2 weeks of Oncology.   
Instructor: Dr. Stuart Helfand

The objective of this course is to give the student additional hands-on practical experience in a clinical setting in taking a clinical history, performing a physical examinations in patients with cancer, biopsy techniques, interpreting thoracic radiographs, aspirating lymph nodes, creating problem lists, compiling lists of differential diagnosis, formulating diagnostic and therapeutic plans, discussing treatment options, generating medical records, and discharging patients.  Students will be responsible for case follow up. Emphasis will be placed on patient evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of diseases of dogs, cats and horses.


VMC 721. Small Animal Clinical Nutrition. 1 credit  
Instructors: Drs. Debbie Davenport and David L. Hammond, nutritionists with the Mark Morris Foundation

Clinical nutrition is an integral part of veterinary practice.  Providing the concepts of clinical nutrition to third year veterinary students gives them the basic knowledge necessary to apply these concepts to the treatment of sick and injured feline and canine patients. This course will consist of lectures and case discussions. Cases will illustrate common clinical problems in dogs and cats in which nutrition plays an important role. These may include: obesity and weight loss, hepatic lipidosis, diabetes, renal failure, cancer, bloat, inflammatory bowel disease, colitis, urolithiasis, nutritional deficiencies, and home-made pet food .


VMC 726 Small Animal Theriogenology.  1 credit
Advanced clinical experience in small animal (canine) reproduction.

VMC 730  Analgesia in Animals.  1 credit
This course will cover pain physiology, pain assessment, a variety of pain management techniques, the analgesic drugs classes available, and alternative modalities. Topics will be presented in traditional format and case based discussions.    


VMC 731 Small Animal Emergency. Dove Lewis, 2 weeks, 3 credits. Can be repeated for 1 week equals 1 credit if taken as a preceptorship. Course is taught in Portland at the Dove Lewis Memorial Emergency Clinic
Instructors: Dove Lewis clinic veterinarians and emergency/critical care specialists

This is an elective rotation where the students will become part of the team at the Dove Lewis Memorial Emergency Clinic in Portland Oregon.  They will assist in the care of emergency and critically ill patients.  They will take part in doctor rounds and case discussions.

The course objectives are to expose students to the field of emergency and critical care medicine, to provide an opportunity for students to learn the value of the team approach,  to become familiar with the indications for and the limitations of intensive monitoring tools used in critical care medicine, to learn the art of triage, to provide a setting for students to learn to recognize and treat certain key emergency and critical care situations such as shock, respiratory distress, CPR and to provide the opportunity to use the knowledge and clinical skills learned in the veterinary curriculum in a “real –life” clinical setting.   

Note: This elective takes place in Portland. Students are responsible for finding their own housing. The hours include evenings and weekends.


VMC 740 Sheep and Goat Medicine and Surgery.  2 weeks, 3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Erica McKenzie

The course objectives are to make the student aware of what is expected of veterinarians in a sheep and/or goat practice; To show ways that the veterinarian can help solve disease and management problems of sheep or goat producers, therefore improving the economic situation; to help the student understand in more depth the important diseases, and how they influence production goals and profit margins.  

Discussions will include: sheep and goat husbandry,  sheep production methods, goals for production and disease control, economic diseases and preventable diseases of lambs, feeders, breeding ewes, and dairy goats.  

Students will perform common procedures and surgeries used in small ruminant practice such asincluding: caesarean sections on ewes, dehorning goats, , hoof trimming, castrating, tail docking, and possibly vasectomies for teaser ram preparation.  Field trips will take students to several sheep producersfarms and several goat farms, a goat dairy, and a livestock auction, where some of the procedures will be performed.  


VMC 741 Large Animal GI Surgery. 1 week, 1 credit
Instructor: Dr. Jill Parker and other faculty

The purpose of this course is to provide the education needed for students entering large animal practice to evaluate and manage large animal patients with gastrointestinal problems and to recognize cases that should be referred if required treatment is beyond the scope of their practice.

The course is taught with lectures with slides, case examples, evaluation of laboratory specimens, techniques laboratories, surgery laboratories, discussion, peer presentations, and reading of text books and original literature. This course includes laboratories that utilize live animals, and one horse (usually donated to the College of Veterinary Medicine) and one bovine (either donated or purchased at auction if a donation is not obtained) will be operated upon under general anesthesia and be euthanized at the end of the procedure while still under general anesthesia.  The horses and in all instances thus far, the cattle used in this course have uncorrectable problems and would be euthanized whether or not they are included in this course.)

VMC 742 Camelid Medicine and Surgery. 2 weeks, 3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Chris Cebra and others.   

The objective of this course is to familiarize fourth-year veterinary students with all aspects of New World camelid health care and make them proficient at performing the necessary physical and mental tasks. After completing the course students will be able to establish lists of differential diagnoses, develop diagnostic and therapeutic plans, interpret laboratory tests and physical examination findings, formulate rations, and develop herd health strategies.  They will be able to show how to perform: venipuncture, intravenous catheterization, peritoneal fluid collection, passage of a nasogastric tube, pregnancy diagnosis, routine castration, physical examination, sedation and induction of anesthesia, fecal examination, positioning for radiographs, restraint, dental procedures, foot procedures, injection of medications, body condition scoring, and safe handling.

Teaching methods and resources include lectures, laboratories with live animals, slide sets, body fluid samples and fecal samples, digital image presentations, and demonstration reference material.   


VMC 743  Advanced Equine Reproduction
A two-week course in advanced clinical experience in equine reproduction.

VMC 744 Advanced Equine Lameness. 2 weeks, 3 credits
Instructors: Dr. Stacy Semevolos and Mike Huber.  

This course is designed to reinforce the anatomical and multiple diagnostic methods of investigating lameness in horses including diagnostic nerve and joint blocks, ultrasound, scintigraphy and radiology.  Students will perform exams and work-ups on multiple cases of lameness in donated or special client horses brought in for this class.

After completing the course the student will be able to: appraise the gait of horses, demonstrate the use of nerve blocks, differentiate the different causes of lameness, formulate a plan for treating each condition causing lameness, implement the use of ultrasound, scintigraphy and radiology in the diagnosis of lameness, and justify the use of diagnostic procedures and treatment in lame horses.

Teaching methods and resources include slides and Powerpoint lectures, cadaver specimens, college-owned equine patients, lame horses belonging to clients, videotapes, preparation of an independent topic


VMC 746 Caine Center Food Animal Medicine.  4 weeks, 6 credits
This course is offered in Caldwell, Idaho with Caine Center faculty It is scheduled through WSU’s coordinator Lisa Lujan, lisal@vetmed.wsu.edu. Contact her to inquire about space available in the specific blocks.
Caine Center does provide housing but  they have been charging $100 per block.

The students will gain experience in feedlot medicine and management principles and implementation through on-site participation in feedlot operation(s).  Students will spend various times in-residence at a local 2000-50000 head back-grounding feedlot, a 10,000+ head back-grounding/finishing feedlot and a 120,000+ finishing feedlot.  They will be expected to prepare appropriate report for ranchers, the Caine Center and colleagues to be presented in written and oral formats.

Options may include:
Agricultural Animal Medicine/Surgery - Caine Sheep
Agricultural Animal Medicine/Surgery – Small Ruminant
Preventive Medicine
Agricultural Animal Medicine/Surgery - Caine Feedlot
Agricultural Animal Medicine/Surgery - Caine Beef Calving
Agricultural Animal Medicine/Surgery – Caine Dairy
Contact: Dr. Marie Bulgin
University of Idaho
Caine Veterinary Teaching Center
1020 E. Homedale Rd., Caldwell, Idaho   83607
Phone: 208-454-8657
FAX 208-454-8659
E-mail: mbulgin@uidaho.edu (copy of email to:  ldubose@uidaho.edu)


VMC 747 Clinical Anesthesia II.  2 weeks, 3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Tom Riebold

This course provides an additional two week, rotation in veterinary anesthesiology utilizing patients presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital.  PREREQ: VMC 737
Students should review their notes from VM 768 prior to beginning the rotation.
A videotape and DVD covering monitoring anesthetized horses and cattle is required viewing the first morning of the rotation.  A collection of reprints of anesthesia related journal articles is available for self-study and discussion.  As they become available, use of anesthesia simulation programs in the computer laboratory can be useful.


VMC 748 Equine Dentistry. 1 week, 1 credit
Instructors: Dr. Mike Huber and TBA with outside instructor.

Utilizing modern, motorized equipment, cadaver specimens, and live horses owned by the hospital and hospital clients, students will have the unique opportunity to learn and perform modern methods of equine dental prophylaxis and treatment.  Lectures followed by discussion and laboratory will allow direct clinical application of presented principles.  Completion of this course will allow and encourage new graduates to apply these methods to horses encountered in practice situations. Learning resources include videotapes, cadavers, theriogenology horses, and student and client horses requiring dental prophylaxis


VMC 750 Equine Nutrition.  1 week, 1 credit        
Instructor: Dr. Meri Stratton-Phelps

The goal of this course is to provide the veterinary student with a foundation of knowledge of equine nutrition that can be used in veterinary practice. Lectures will cover a variety of topics including basic nutrition, life stage feeding and clinical nutrition. Clinical case discussions will be presented to emphasize important lecture concepts.  


VMC 751 Ruminant Nutrition. 2 credits  
Will be taught winter term on Monday, Wednesday and Friday 11:00 am-1:00 p.m. Dates to be determined. There may be some afternoons. The elective will not be scheduled to conflict with any of the required courses.
Instructors: Drs. Charles Estill, Neil Forsberg, other Animal Sciences faculty

This course will cover the basics of ruminant nutrition essential for good herd/flock management and production.  The students will review basic rumen physiology and the ruminant’s unique digestive process.  They will understand nutrient requirements and forage and feed analysis.  They will go through the basic steps of ration evaluation, and learn the processes involved in harvesting and preserving forages.  They will learn the nutritional management of dairy cattle, beef cattle, feedlot cattle, sheep and goats.  They will review the common nutritional and metabolic problems of these species.   Students will learn about the rearing of and nutrition of pre-ruminants.

The course will consist of didactic lectures, discussions, and a few laboratory sessions where students will analyze rations, evaluate feedstuffs and look at computer software.
The course is a PREREQUISITE for Cattle Production Medicine, VMC 758, and recommended for Sheep and Goat Medicine and Surgery, VMC 740.


VMC 752 Clinical Large Animal Medicine II. 4 weeks, 6 credits, or 2 weeks, 3 credits or 1 week, 1 credit
Instructors: Large animal clinical faculty

Additional clinical experience in large animal medicine. Added responsibility will be given to students taking this course as an elective.


VMC 754 Clinical Large Animal Surgery II. 4 weeks, 6 credits or 2 weeks, 3 credits
Instructors: Large animal clinical faculty

Additional clinical experience in large animal surgery. Added responsibility will be given to students taking this course as an elective.


VMC 755 Rural Vet Practice II. 4 weeks, 6 credits, or 2 weeks, 3 credits
Instructors: RVP faculty

Additional clinical experience in ambulatory medicine. Added responsibility will be given to students taking this course as an elective.

This course affords additional clinical experience in ambulatory medicine and theriogenology. Students may select an area of focus (bovine, equine, theriogenology) if they wish. Added responsibility will be given to students taking this course as an elective.                                                                                               


VMC 758 Cattle Production Medicine. 2 weeks, 3 credits
Instructors: Dr. Charles Estill and others

This course is designed to provide the student interested in entering mixed or food animal practice with critical skills and knowledge not available in the core courses or clinical rotations.  Subjects will include both dairy and beef cattle.   Emphasis will be placed on the basics of a production medicine program, nutrition, mastitis control, replacement management, reproductive programs, and preventive health programs including vaccinations.  Students will be expected to know the basics of individual animal disease diagnosis and treatment, but some review will be provided for the more economically important diseases.  Various record keeping systems will be discussed including microcomputer applications.  Students will become familiar with modern production methods so they will be able to communicate with dairy men and beef cattle producers.   

Some procedures covered in laboratories and field trips are surgical procedures of the udder, condition scoring, computer use and record analysis, and on the farm diagnostic investigation.


VMC 759 Large Animal Palpation Laboratory. 2 weeks, 1 credit.
Instructors: Dr. Charles Estill

This course is designed to provide additional instruction and hands-on experience in rectal palpation and ultrasound in the equine and bovine.

After completion of this course, the students should be able to identify uterus and ovaries and stage of the estrous cycle using palpation and ultrasonography and diagnose pregnancy in the cow and the mare.


VMC 779  Equine and Canine Sports Medicine.
1 week, 2 credits
Instructors: Drs. Erica McKenzie and Linda Blythe

The main objective of this course is to provide students with information they do not receive in the core curriculum regarding the canine and equine performance industries. Throughout the course students will attend lectures and discussion covering issues specific to these industries, as well as practical demonstrations to allow them to practice techniques relevant to their potential role as veterinarians in these industries.

Students will participate in lectures and laboratories regarding exercise physiology, injuries and rehabilitation methods used in various equine and canine athletes, including sled dogs, greyhounds, race horses and other performance horses. A one day field trip will include visits to the canine rehabilitation facility, the guide dogs for the blind training facility and the Portland Equine Racetrack. Practical classes and demonstrations will include examination of sporting dog injuries, pre-purchase examination of horses intended for athletic use, and splinting and bandaging for equine emergencies


VMC 763 Advanced Cardiology. 1 credit. 10 weeks, 2 hours per week. (Min. 1, Max 24)
Instructor:David Sisson

This course is designed to provide interested students more thorough exposure and understanding of cardiovascular disease than the general medicine course allows.  Following completion of this elective, students should be able to successfully complete all of the listed learning outcomes.

Methods, learning resources: Discussions/labs ECG work sheets, case studies with still-frame images and video clips, echocardiographic studies, textbook reading,


VMC 789 Pet Practice, Banfield. 2 weeks 3 credits   
This course is offered in Portland at the Banfield Animal Hospital.
Instructors: Drs. J. Darrell Phillips, Hugh Lewis and other veterinarians and staff at Banfield.

This course will take place at a primary care practice at one of the Banfield pet hospitals.  This is a corporate veterinary practice.   Students will attend an orientation where discussions will be held on: pet as a member of the family, wellness care for pets, what clients want, need for new clients, use of technicians, charging for services, generating a net income for the practice.

This will be followed by attendance at one of the Banfield Pet hospitals for at least 64 hours, at which time the student will take part in examination of patients and the work-up of primary cases.  Students will have a time each day in which they will be able to discuss cases with the clinician in charge.  Students while in attendance will be considered part of the medical team by both veterinarians and technicians, and allowed to take part in discussions and procedures to the extent of their skills.   Each student will be assigned a mentor.  The purpose is to expose the student to a primary care pet hospital as a doctor in training.   The doctor in training will participate in a variety of procedures and practices from the common to the complex.  These procedures will be associated with the primary role of the doctor:  physical examination, diagnostics, treatment plans, surgery, client communications, and training team members.  Students will take medical histories, and be videotaped and critiqued on their performance.

Students will be evaluated by the Banfield veterinarians and staff at the end of each rotation.
The block will start with orientation on Monday, followed by duty as part of the hospital team through Saturday, and continue from Tuesday through Friday of the following week.
The CVM will register students for the elective, and send the names of students and times they will attend to Banfield at least 6 months prior to the block.  If the student wants to change the times they will have to get approval from Banfield and the CVM.

Jenna Hudson, MS, PHR
College Recruiter-Veterinary Selection
p: 503.922.5358
f:  503.922.6358
www.banfield.net
Email: Jenna.Hudson@banfield.net


VMC 792 Small Animal Clinical Medicine II.  2 weeks, 3 credits
Instructors: Dr. Jana Gordon and other small animal medical faculty

The purpose of this elective is to give the student additional hands-on practical experience in a clinical setting in taking a clinical history, performing a physical examinations, creating problem lists, compiling lists of differential diagnosis, formulating diagnostic plans,  formulating therapeutic plans, obtaining diagnostic samples, interpreting laboratory reports, discussing treatment options, generating medical records, and discharging patients.  Students will be responsible for case follow up. The course will be taught using daily topic and case rounds as well as participation in clinical case management. PREREQ VMC 791


VMC 798 Small Animal Clinical Surgery II. 2 weeks, 3 credits  
Instructors: Small animal surgical faculty

This course will be a two week elective rotation for 4th year professional veterinary students.  Students will be assigned to surgeons on and learn based on clinical case material, review topics, and the surgical literature.  Students will participate in medicine and surgery rounds at least once each day.  Every student will make a formal rounds presentation to other students and faculty at least once during the course.  PREREQs VM 725 & 785.

VMC 790 Bovine palpation.  1 Week, 1 credit  
Instructor: Dr. Charles Estill

This course is designed to provide additional instruction and experience in transrectal examination of the female bovine genital tract. An opportunity to attempt ultrasonographic visualization of the genital tract will be offered. At the conclusion of this course students will be expected to identify all parts of the reproductive tract, identify ovarian structures, diagnose pregnancy status, and estimate stage of gestation.